This 17th-century oak armchair with a carved back panel belonged to William Morris, who kept it in the library at Kelmscott House, 26 Upper Mall, Hammersmith. As a brass plate on the back of the chair records, it was given to Walker by Jane Morris, William Morris’s widow. Walker kept it in the hall of his country house at Daneway, Gloucestershire, as recorded in the 1929 inventory of the house: 'A XVIIth century elbow chair with inlaid panel and carved back in geometrical designs. (The property of the late William Morris).’ On its seat is a tapestry cushion embroidered for Walker by May Morris [02345], with the dedication ‘MM to EW’. May Morris, William Morris’s younger daughter, ran the embroidery section of Morris & Co. from 1885 to 1896, taught at the Royal School of Needlework and designed jewellery and textiles. She founded the Women’s Guild of Art in 1907. May lived at 8 Hammersmith Terrace from 1890 to 1923. This 17th-century oak armchair with a carved back panel belonged to William Morris, who kept it in the library at Kelmscott House, 26 Upper Mall, Hammersmith. As a brass plate on the back of the chair records, it was given to Walker by Jane Morris, William Morris’s widow. Walker kept it in the hall of his country house at Daneway, Gloucestershire, as recorded in the 1929 inventory of the house: 'A XVIIth century elbow chair with inlaid panel and carved back in geometrical designs. (The property of the late William Morris).’ On its seat is a tapestry cushion embroidered for Walker by May Morris [02345], with the dedication ‘MM to EW’. May Morris, William Morris’s younger daughter, ran the embroidery section of Morris & Co. from 1885 to 1896, taught at the Royal School of Needlework and designed jewellery and textiles. She founded the Women’s Guild of Art in 1907. May lived at 8 Hammersmith Terrace from 1890 to 1923.

Record ID:00013
Dimensions:Height — 100cm.
Width — 62.5cm.
Depth — 40.5cm.
Classification:Furniture